Room 241: A Blog by
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Are you a workaholic or a passionate teacher?

Are you a workaholic or just a passionate teacher?

By The Room 241 Team February 14, 2019

Being a teacher doesn’t stop when the bell rings. You take work home more often than not – it just comes with the territory. However, there is a fine line between being a passionate teacher and being a workaholic. Take the quiz to find out where you stand.

Mid-Year Teacher Check-In: How are we doing?

By The Room 241 Team February 11, 2019

The middle of the school year is the perfect time to check in and see how you, your students, and your colleagues are doing so far. Reflection isn’t just about surfacing the things that need course correcting. It’s also about identifying and celebrating the good and figuring out how to grow upon those areas of… Read More

The Emotions of Learning: Q&A with Marc Brackett, PhD

By Jennifer Gunn February 6, 2019

Social-emotional and trauma-informed learning and teaching are at the forefront of education research and study today. The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) reports that nearly 50 percent of the children in the U.S. have experienced “at least one or more types of serious childhood trauma.” Therefore, ignoring emotions in the classroom can absolutely pose… Read More

The Hashtags and Chats Every Educator Should Be Following

By The Room 241 Team February 4, 2019

Not on Twitter? You should be! Twitter is an immeasurably useful tool for educators. Beyond building a network of educators from around the world, Twitter chats and free PDs are happening every day — literally — with some of the biggest and brightest thinkers and practitioners out there. Here’s a look at the most useful and… Read More

How many five-paragraph essays do students write in their school career? A lot. How many standardized tests require an essay? Most of them. How many essays will students need to write after college? Eh, probably not that many. Essays have their function, but they’re certainly not the only academically rigorous form of writing, nor are… Read More

The Power of Storytelling Activities in the Classroom

By Jennifer Gunn January 29, 2019

If you think about it, stories are the very origin of education. The passing down of stories from generation to generation taught us history, culture, skills, and knowledge. “Thinking of teaching as storytelling…encourages us to think of the curriculum as a collection of the great stories of our culture,” says Kieran Egan. “If we begin… Read More

Many educators and school leaders try to address the needs associated with at-risk students, but it is a complex issue. While there have been some studies that show how the arts can positively impact at-risk students’ academic performance, Oscar Houchins, III, EdD, could not find any in which researchers show how an art-related program utilizing… Read More

In her viral TED Talk “Every Kid Needs a Champion,” 40-year educator Rita Pierson, recounted a time when she heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.” When most of us think back to our time in school, our stories tend… Read More

How to Encourage Student Self-Efficacy

By Jennifer Gunn January 7, 2019

A confident classroom is a successful classroom. How do you build a culture of academic excellence in classrooms that promote student accountability, confidence, and success? By encouraging a growth mindset for all learners, finding ways to boost their confidence and their sense of academic potential. Here’s a look at a few ways to cultivate student… Read More

Teachers work hard, putting in tons of hours both at school and at home. They use their own money for supplies. They decorate classrooms to create beautiful learning environments. They create lessons, projects, and units that have to factor in an ever-changing landscape of “musts.” They have endless meetings and responsibilities on top of their… Read More

Learning from the past and innovating for our future — these are two crucial skills that aren’t focused on enough in our classrooms today, but some teachers are working to change that. Award-winning educator Luke Glassett teaches AP World History and Contemporary World Problems and serves as the head coach of a highly successful robotics team… Read More

As the calendar year comes to a close, it’s time to pause and reflect on our teaching practice. Teachers often focus on what we didn’t get done, what we still have to do, and the mistakes we’ve made along the way. This can quickly lead to burnout. It’s time to flip your reflection game and… Read More

When is Differentiation Detrimental?

By Jennifer Gunn December 13, 2018

Educators have gotten very good at building scaffolds for student learning, but are we going too far? Are we underestimating our students’ ability to struggle and then succeed? When is it time to step back? Should every assignment have scaffolds? Let’s explore if and when differentiation and scaffolding should take a backseat to healthy learning… Read More

How to Break the Cycle of Student Misbehavior

By Kathryn Picano Morton, EdS, NCSP December 5, 2018

Getting a child to behave when expected can be quite a challenging task. When a student engages in misbehavior, that child is often attempting to get a response from the adult. Reacting to challenging behaviors negatively – yelling, using corporal punishment, removing the child from the setting, enforcing “timeouts,”– tends to exacerbate the issue. It… Read More

How Personal Trauma Can Lead to Teacher Burnout

By Amy Anderson, MEd, LPC, LADC November 27, 2018

You may have seen it, been around it, or maybe you’re experiencing it right now: teacher burnout. It’s sadly very common and it can often be labeled as Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS). Many of us struggle to find ways to set boundaries, recognize our own limitations, and prioritize our personal needs. It becomes even more… Read More