Trauma and Resilience

When it comes to resilience, an interesting exercise is to take a look at the multitude of quizzes available online. From the popular BuzzFeed to more of a magazine format to pop-psychology evaluations, you can get a generalized sense of how resilient you are/aren’t compared to the masses (always keep in mind there can be… Read More

How to Create a Culture of Self-Care in Your School

By Ashley Watters November 13, 2019

Modern classrooms are a reflection of the fast-paced world we live in. Multiple tasks and students consistently vie for your attention. In this kind of brisk environment, self-care becomes extremely important for educators. Self-care is not synonymous with selfish Teaching is a true balancing act of attending to the needs of many different people. You… Read More

Bullies have always been a constant presence in school environments. Until recently, bullies were simply an expected “character” in schools — along with the “teacher’s pet” or “class clown.”  Students who were bullied were expected to “toughen up,” ignore the behavior, or “fight back.” Today, bullying behavior is no longer expected or accepted in most… Read More

Is It Student Laziness or Something More?

By Jennifer Gunn March 5, 2019

Everyone’s heard a fellow educator say, “My students are so lazy!” It’s definitely frustrating when students moan and groan or fail to hand in assignments. Some say that teachers should never work harder than the students, and that school must be rigorous and demanding in order to prepare students for the real world. And of… Read More

As educators, we have a professional and ethical responsibility to provide students with safe, equitable, and inclusive academic experiences. Traditional discipline procedures, such as zero-tolerance policies, school suspensions, and punishment-reward practices are often ineffective in correcting misbehaviors and disproportionately impact students of color. For these reasons, the paradigm is shifting from zero-tolerance policies in schools… Read More

The Emotions of Learning: Q&A with Marc Brackett, PhD

By Jennifer Gunn February 6, 2019

Social-emotional and trauma-informed learning and teaching are at the forefront of education research and study today. The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) reports that nearly 50 percent of the children in the U.S. have experienced “at least one or more types of serious childhood trauma.” Therefore, ignoring emotions in the classroom can absolutely pose… Read More

The Power of Storytelling Activities in the Classroom

By Jennifer Gunn January 29, 2019

If you think about it, stories are the very origin of education. The passing down of stories from generation to generation taught us history, culture, skills, and knowledge. “Thinking of teaching as storytelling…encourages us to think of the curriculum as a collection of the great stories of our culture,” says Kieran Egan. “If we begin… Read More

How to Break the Cycle of Student Misbehavior

By Kathryn Picano Morton, EdS, NCSP December 5, 2018

Getting a child to behave when expected can be quite a challenging task. When a student engages in misbehavior, that child is often attempting to get a response from the adult. Reacting to challenging behaviors negatively – yelling, using corporal punishment, removing the child from the setting, enforcing “timeouts,”– tends to exacerbate the issue. It… Read More

Understanding Culturally Responsive Teaching

By Jennifer Gunn December 3, 2018

Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) is so much more than a trendy education term, but many educators struggle to define it. They are unsure of how it’s different from other equitable teaching practices and they can’t explain how to utilize it in their classrooms. Zaretta Hammond’s popular book Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain: Promoting Authentic… Read More

How Personal Trauma Can Lead to Teacher Burnout

By Amy Anderson, MEd, LPC, LADC November 27, 2018

You may have seen it, been around it, or maybe you’re experiencing it right now: teacher burnout. It’s sadly very common and it can often be labeled as Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS). Many of us struggle to find ways to set boundaries, recognize our own limitations, and prioritize our personal needs. It becomes even more… Read More

One of Concordia University-Portland’s most popular master’s degrees is our MEd in Curriculum & Instruction: Trauma & Resilience in Educational Settings, and we’re excited to welcome a new adjunct instructor for this program. Morgan Jenkins, PhD, is a licensed professional counselor in Alabama with a doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision. She teaches our “Trauma-Sensitive… Read More

Useful Counseling Activities to Promote Social-Emotional Learning

By Carlete Metoyer, MA November 9, 2018

Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) has become popular amongst K-12 educators and even education service providers, such as American College Testing (ACT). SEL no longer resides solely in counseling offices; it has become a collective movement to ensure educators meet the needs of the whole student. As a counselor for 10 years and teacher for three years, I… Read More

Post-Crisis Challenges Associated with School Shootings

By Gail Kirby, EdD October 20, 2018

We never want to think about our worst fears but, when it comes to our school’s crisis preparedness, we need to make sure we have the proper protocol in place. Research indicates that schools are the least prepared to handle crises such as school shootings. Scant evidence-based data exist to help understand the challenges that school districts… Read More

How Teens Can Benefit From Recess

By Kara Wyman, MEd October 8, 2018

When we think of recess and playtime, most of us think of cute little kids on the playground. But couldn’t our middle and high school students benefit from a break too? Adolescents often face a variety of challenges and, while I’m not suggesting we get teens on monkey bars or force a game of tag,… Read More

Unpacking Authority and Implicit Bias in Schools

By The Room 241 Team September 10, 2018

The concepts of compliance and authority are firmly rooted in many of our nation’s schools and classrooms. These precepts still ping around our learning institutions, driven by implicit bias and preserving a profound disconnect between students and learning. Teachers hold the key to unpacking authority and bias in classrooms to truly transform the learning experiences… Read More