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Teacher-Parent Relationships

Wow-Factor Schools: 8 Ways to Build an Awesome School Culture

By Jennifer L.M. Gunn June 27, 2018

Some schools have such a positive school culture that you can see and feel it as soon as you enter the building. It’s evident on the walls, in the students and staff, and in every classroom you visit. How can school leaders foster such a rich and positive school climate? It starts by first understanding… Read More

Hunger Pains: Teaching Hungry Students

By Jennifer L.M. Gunn May 29, 2018

Cranky. Tired. Lethargic. Moody. Sick. Failing. These are just a few things that happen when students are hungry. Schools—and especially classroom teachers—can play a vital role in helping kids stay healthy and learn. Here’s a look at how. The problem of hunger In our nation’s suburbs, urban areas, and rural towns, over 13 million children… Read More

When students act out in class, there’s often a trigger. And those triggers can be rooted in adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) that can have long-term effects such as cognitive and social-emotional impairment, high-risk behaviors, social issues, and even disease, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Understanding these triggers and what to… Read More

Celebrating Teachers Making a Difference

By Room 241 Team May 7, 2018

Almost every teacher will tell you that they didn’t choose their profession for the spotlight. For many teachers, their greatest successes are seemingly small gestures, words of encouragement, and moments of connection that happen with their students in the classroom every day. Still, these teachers are making an impact by developing innovative curricula, thoughtfully engaging… Read More

Inclusive Education: What It Means, Proven Strategies, and a Case Study

By Dr. Lilla Dale McManis November 20, 2017

Considering the potential of inclusive education at your school, or, perhaps, are you currently working in an inclusive classroom and looking for effective strategies? Lean in to this deep-dive article on inclusive education to gather a solid understanding of what it means, what the research shows, and proven strategies that bring out the benefits for… Read More

A parent catches you at drop-off one morning and wants to know why her son got in trouble the day before, since he never misbehaves at home. A colleague presents a proposal at a staff meeting that you are certain will not work. At the end of a long day of parent-teacher conferences, you are… Read More

Most parents encourage their children to read during the summer and point to examples of language and word usage all around them. But that’s not how they usually approach math, says Kathy Zolla, a Colorado middle school math teacher. Zolla notes that students often like the idea of having a math-free summer, which often results… Read More

Imagine that your school district has recently adopted a new math curriculum that will significantly change how students learn new math concepts, approach homework and get evaluated. The explanations of how to do math problems and the expectations of students will be different from previous years — and probably different from what parents remember from… Read More

For the second year in a row, my daughter launched a full-fledged campaign against standardized testing. About a week before the tests began, she argued they were ineffective and unfair. She echoed the concerns of a variety of students, parents and teachers: It’s a bad measure, it’s stressful, it doesn’t influence grades, it takes too… Read More

A parent complains about a student’s test grade. A colleague is unhappy about a comment you made at the last staff meeting. An administrator questions the way you handled a recent email exchange with a parent. In addition to facing a classroom full of students each day, teachers have to contend with relationships — and… Read More

Some people go into teaching because it seems like a family-friendly job: almost no travel, vacations at the same time as your kids, hours that match your kids’ school hours. The reality, though, can be very different. Students may be emailing homework questions while your own children need attention. Teachers can spend hours on weekends… Read More

Tablets, smartphones and personal computers give elementary school children access to information in ways that were unimaginable to their parents and teachers. Deadly and dangerous challenges can’t be ignored. Bullying. Sexting. Adults posing as kids to abduct children. Brandi Davis, a certified child and family coach, drives this point home repeatedly in conversations with moms, dads… Read More

Each workday in the U.S., 69 million children become separated from their families to attend school or receive child care. If disaster strikes, schools, families and anybody else responsible for children’s welfare need proper plans to keep young people safe. One organization devoted to making that happen is Save the Children, which has been protecting… Read More

Today’s education models tend to focus on a child’s achievement deficits — if students aren’t reading at grade level, for instance, then teachers try to get them caught up. Mindprint Learning flips this model, using cognitive tests to identify children’s strengths and engage them in ways that compensate for their weaknesses. The goal: Let kids… Read More

As summer comes to an end, preparing for the school year and welcoming classrooms full of fresh faces is a great time to add a few tools to the teaching toolbox. Establishing new practices at the beginning of the year seems daunting, but it can help set up long-term success in building and maintaining positive… Read More