Middle School (Grades: 6-8)

Substitute Teacher: Education, Salary, and Outlook

By The Room 241 Team January 20, 2020

A substitute teacher’s role is vital to the smooth operation of a school. Substitutes step in, sometimes on very short notice, for teachers who can’t be in the classroom for anything between a single day to several weeks. Substitute teachers have many of the same qualifications as full-time teaching staff, though it’s also a common… Read More

The Power of Stickers for Motivation and Positive Behavior

By Darri Stephens December 24, 2019

I remember when I first started teaching, and I would pick up the phone to call students’ homes. I not only could hear the trepidation in the parents’ voices, but I could feel them on the other end bracing for bad news: what their child had done wrong, how their child hadn’t met expectations, or… Read More

One African proverb states “a wise man never knows all; only a fool knows everything.” Regardless of how worldly, educated, or well-traveled we are, we can never know everything. But by recognizing our own biases and accepting that we can learn from others, we establish the groundwork for growth and promote the cultivation of independent… Read More

All educators have tough cases. You know the ones — those kiddos who persistently color on classroom materials that are most definitely NOT meant for art displays. Or the middle schoolers who just can’t seem to internalize the phrase, “keep your hands to yourself.” These students are difficult for teachers and having to communicate the… Read More

Teachers get to have so many positive moments. They inspire, educate, engage, mentor, and lead. It’s these moments that make the less-than-glamorous aspects of teaching all worthwhile. But sometimes, situations will arise where it will be difficult to paste on a smile and forge ahead. Negative behaviors are simply a fact of life for teachers…. Read More

10 Alternatives for Those Classes Before Break

By The Room 241 Team November 22, 2019

The days before break can be equal parts exhausting and exciting. It’s often hard to plan valuable learning experiences for students when they’re counting down the minutes till break. So what do most teachers do? Pop in a movie. Don’t get me wrong — there’s nothing wrong with movies. They can be very informational and… Read More

I Don’t Like School: Inspiring the Uninspired Student

By Jennifer Gunn April 26, 2019

Every teacher, every year, has at least one student who utters those heartbreaking words: “I just don’t like school.” These words are uttered by the student who says they “just want to be left alone,” and who is resigned to get through their education with as little effort and bother as possible. But what are… Read More

The Emotions of Learning: Q&A with Marc Brackett, PhD

By Jennifer Gunn February 6, 2019

Social-emotional and trauma-informed learning and teaching are at the forefront of education research and study today. The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) reports that nearly 50 percent of the children in the U.S. have experienced “at least one or more types of serious childhood trauma.” Therefore, ignoring emotions in the classroom can absolutely pose… Read More

How many five-paragraph essays do students write in their school career? A lot. How many standardized tests require an essay? Most of them. How many essays will students need to write after college? Eh, probably not that many. Essays have their function, but they’re certainly not the only academically rigorous form of writing, nor are… Read More

The Power of Storytelling Activities in the Classroom

By Jennifer Gunn January 29, 2019

If you think about it, stories are the very origin of education. The passing down of stories from generation to generation taught us history, culture, skills, and knowledge. “Thinking of teaching as storytelling…encourages us to think of the curriculum as a collection of the great stories of our culture,” says Kieran Egan. “If we begin… Read More

There are close to five million English learners in U.S. public schools, which has increased by about eight percent since 2000. Teachers must adjust their teaching styles to fit their needs, and that means they need to be armed with the tools and knowledge to do so effectively. Rachael Hoffert, EdD, who recently earned her… Read More

Using Learning Stations in Middle School

By Sarah Knutson December 20, 2018

Teaching via stations or learning centers feels familiar to elementary school teachers, but offering them in middle school may not feel entirely comfortable at first glance. I used to occasionally utilize stations to cover specific content very quickly but after I heard Catlin Tucker speak at a professional development seminar, I realized the potential impact I could… Read More

In order for students to be successful in school, they first have to be in school. Seems logical, right? But for millions of students in the U.S., attendance is a barrier to success with lifelong consequences. Here’s a look at how chronic absenteeism impacts learning, and how schools can begin to turn the tide. Measuring… Read More

You Know You’re a Middle School Teacher When…

By The Room 241 Team November 15, 2018

Middle school students are in a class of their own, so it takes a certain type of teacher to really get them. There’s really nothing like teaching students in the thick of it when it comes to their peers, puberty, and that tween-to-teen logic. Many feel middle schoolers are the most challenging group, while others love… Read More

How Teens Can Benefit From Recess

By Kara Wyman, MEd October 8, 2018

When we think of recess and playtime, most of us think of cute little kids on the playground. But couldn’t our middle and high school students benefit from a break too? Adolescents often face a variety of challenges and, while I’m not suggesting we get teens on monkey bars or force a game of tag,… Read More