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“I dream big for my students”: Q&A with Anita Green, MEd ’15

By The Room 241 Team September 18, 2017

Since Anita Green flew from Louisiana to Oregon for her Concordia University-Portland MEd graduation, her world and her work have continued to expand in meaningful and exciting ways. She has a passion for helping economically disadvantaged students, but doesn’t limit her service to students alone.

This summer, Anita traveled to Ghana to help teachers improve their skills. Find out more about Anita in our Q&A, in which she shares what she’s currently up to, her favorite MEd course, and how she got her school to receive free supplies.

Can you share your educational background with us?

My educational background includes an Associate of Science in Day Care & Nursery Management, a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of Louisiana at Monroe, and Master of Education with a focus on Early Childhood Education from Concordia University-Portland.

My educational background has prepared me well for an Early Childhood Educator position and for a successful career path; and the Master of Education from Concordia greatly contributed to the skills I’ve developed such as planning and providing engaging instructional methods. I also plan to pursue further coursework in the future in order to keep learning and gaining the qualifications to advance in the education field.

What are you currently doing or what have you recently done that you’d like to share with fellow educators?

I am currently employed as a first grade teacher at Winnsboro Elementary School in Winnsboro, Louisiana. I was recently nominated by my co-worker, Mrs. Krista Donald, for the “Kids in Need Foundation’s” awards during Teacher Appreciation Week this past May. On May 15, 2017, I was selected for that recognition, which means all the teachers at Winnsboro Elementary School will receive Yoobi kits filled with elementary school supplies like markers, folders, rulers, pencils, glue, and crayons. I was so excited because I teach in a rural area and the parents can’t afford to buy their children school supplies. For the past two years, I purchased all my students’ supplies. But for the 2017-2018 academic year, I will not have to do this.

Also, I was selected as a Limited Resource Teacher Training (LRTT) fellow to travel to Ghana, Africa and participate in training to help teachers improve their skills. I joined 25 teachers from around the world for three weeks this past July, and visited several schools and participated in workshops that deliver effective teacher training to teachers there. I applied to be a LRTT fellow to help teachers in Ghana improve their instructional methods because I want to help other teachers who live in less economically developed countries and didn’t get the great training I received.

My trip to Ghana was a dream come true. I built a lifetime bond with the fellows and am still in contact with them today. I will actually be traveling back to Ghana in March of 2017 to visit my sponsor child, also named Anita; I did not want to leave her, but I know I have made a difference in her life.

What inspired you to become an educator?

My former teachers at Mer Rouge Elementary School and Delta High School inspired me to become an educator. They helped me become excited about education and they really cared about me as a student.

What have you continued to utilize from your education at Concordia University-Portland?

I have continued to utilize the knowledge and teaching methods I gained from Concordia. I am grateful and thankful for receiving my MEd from there since it played an enormous part in my passion to help all children and to be a highly effective educator. My Enrollment Specialist, Gail Dudley, was so compassionate, warm-hearted, and very knowledgeable about the MEd. Gail listened to the passion in my voice the first time I talked to her two years ago about earning a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus on Early Childhood Education. Her words and thoughtfulness helped me to achieve one of my lifetime goals. I am so thankful and grateful for Gail Dudley.

Also, the course “Issues and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education 503” enhanced my knowledge about being an advocate for children and families. I was motivated to make a positive impact in all children’s lives and the course really gave me some awesome insights into many different ways to be professionally involved on a state, local, and national level as I continue to advocate for Early Childhood Education.

What keeps you motivated?

Every day, my students who live in poverty keep me motivated. When I look into their eyes, I see the next president, doctor, nurse, teacher, engineer, writer, artist, or business professional. I dream big for my students and I motivate them every day to be the best they can be. I tell them the key to success is education.

What do you still hope to achieve as an educator?

I still hope one day I will be a professor at a Delta Community College in Louisiana or a professor at a local university in Louisiana teaching child development classes or education classes. Down the road, I would like to go the professor route because I want to a make a different type of impact on education through effectively training teachers. All my professors at Concordia University-Portland inspired me to be a highly effective educator, and they played an important part in learning different effective teaching methods that I currently use in my classroom. I have gained an abundance of knowledge and teaching skills from Concordia. I want to someday make an impact on college students who are majoring in Early Childhood Education like I did.

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