Adolescent Literacy

Online Master of Education Degree with an Adolescent Literacy Concentration Video

Online Master of Education Degree with an Adolescent Literacy Concentration Video

The M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction: Adolescent Literacy addresses the crisis in adolescent literacy in America’s 6th through 12th grade students. Nearly seven out of every ten 8th graders are working below the proficient level in reading comprehension, and even high school students with average reading ability are unprepared for future workplace and post secondary literacy demands. Through the completion of this concentration, educators will be prepared to lead the development and support of adolescent literacy in schools, school districts and in community-based settings.

Program Objectives for the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction: Adolescent Literacy

In addition to meeting the objectives for all Concordia’s M.Ed. programs, successful candidates in the M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction: Adolescent Literacy, will demonstrate:

  • Expertise in the utilization of new methods of authentic assessment and strategies as tools to evaluate student learning progress.
  • The ability to modify instructional plans and promote alternative goals and strategies when necessary, particularly in relation to assessment results.
  • Effective instructional skills in planning, implementing, and assessing instruction in settings that include diverse cultural populations and special needs students.

Adolescent Literacy Courses

In addition to the four core courses required for a degree in Curriculum and Instruction, students enrolled in the Adolescent Literacy program must also take the following foundation courses:

M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction - Adolescent Literacy
15 credits
EDCI 502 (3)
Adolescent Literacy: The Challenges
This course begins with a study of literacy for adolescents as a meaning-making strategic process, a skill that is essential to achieving proficiency in adolescent literacy. An examination of the sources of challenges to adolescent literacy will be completed - such as the explicit background knowledge needed across academic disciplines in order to successfully read content-area texts. Educators will gain an understanding of the characteristics and needs across the range of students who face challenges in adolescent literacy including struggling readers, reluctant readers, English language learners, students with learning disabilities, and returning young adults. Research-based approaches and best practices to address the challenges of adolescent literacy will be presented.
EDCI 506 (3)
A Developmental Approach to Language Acquisition
Human beings are intimately and irrevocably linked to language. The topic of language acquisition poses profound questions about our understanding of the human mind and leads us to many fascinating and complex areas of study. In this class, students will start at the beginning of language development in children (Pinker, 2008). As Steven Pinker writes in The Language Instinct, "Languages are complex combinations of elegant principles and historical accidents. We cannot design new ones with independent properties: we are stuck with the confounded ones entrenched in communities." Students will, through an interdisciplinary approach, learn how language is acquired from birth through a child's developmental years. Since children are developing their cognitive, perceptual, social, and motor skills at the same time their linguistic systems and specific language repertoire is growing, this study will involve the diverse fields of neurobiology, ethology, naturalistic and experimental child psychology, cognitive psychology, and theoretical and applied computer science.
EDCI 507 (3)
Academic Literacy: Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
The elements essential to the teaching of reading in the academic disciplines will be addressed in this course. Content-embedded instructional practices that improve disciplinary literacy, the use of strategic tutoring, continuous progress monitoring through the use of ongoing formative assessment, data-based decision making and the development of a comprehensive interdisciplinary literacy program are a few of the features of an effective academic literacy program that will be studied.
EDCI 508 (3)
Improving Adolescent Literacy: Transformative Intervention Strategies and the Use of Technology
The use of transformative intervention strategies and the innovative use of technology resources to support and improve adolescent literacy are the focus of this course. Electronic references, video supports such as virtual manipulatives and animated illustrations, digital text, text-to-speech, spell checkers, word prediction software along with how students can adapt the technology used in their daily lives are examples of resources that will be examined for their application in transformative intervention strategies used to improve adolescent literacy.
EDGR 601 (3)
Educational Research
This course provides students with the basic competencies necessary to understand and evaluate the research of others, and to plan and conduct their own research with a minimum of assistance. This course includes the basics of both qualitative and quantitative research.

The Master of Education culminates with two courses: either EDGR 698-Action Research (3), or EDGR 699-Thesis (3). Either option provides candidates with an understanding of the role of research in the field of education as a tool to solve problems and as a way to improve student learning.

The Master of Education culminates with one of two courses
3 credits
EDGR 698 (3)
Action Research (CAPSTONE)
Action Research is the capstone project for the Master of Education program. During this five-week course, candidates will complete final edits of the Literature Review, obtain appropriate permissions, implement Action Research, collect and analyze data from the Action Research implementation, and complete the Action Research Documentation Form.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDGR 601 Educational Research.
EDGR 699 (3)
Thesis (CAPSTONE)
The Thesis offers the graduate student the opportunity to investigate, in depth, a topic in the field of education. The student, working with his or her educational research instructor, will explore relevant literature and present a Thesis following the procedure established by the College of Education.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDGR 601 Educational Research.

Getting Your Master’s Degree Online

The Adolescent Literacy Master’s program is fully online. This online format uses cutting edge curriculum delivered on easy to use online learning technology to provide students with a challenging educational experience. Each online course is 5 weeks in length.

Get started on your application for a Master’s in Adolescent Literacy. To speak with an enrollment specialist call: 1 (877) 251-4405 or start your application here.

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