A Blog for Teachers

We are dedicated to providing the most effective educational resources. We know students are as varied as the educators who teach them, and we strive to support all educators through these meaningful differences. We don’t want to tell you what (not) to do; instead, we want to show how others in similar positions have found success through their own projects and initiatives.

  • Problem-Based Learning: 4 Practical Issues Teachers Need to Deal With

    Posted July 25, 2017

    Problem-based learning (PBL): It’s all the rage. PBL is an innovative addition to modern K-12 pedagogy, but it can seem overwhelming for beginners. It doesn’t have to be, though. PBL’s principal goal—meeting students where they are and putting them to work solving real-world problems—marks a significant shift from old educational models. Putting it into action…

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  • The Making of a Better Math Student: 3 Ways to Overcome Frustration and Encourage Learning

    Posted June 20, 2017

    Students often believe success in math classes requires them to be a “math person.” This thought is as common as a teacher’s struggle to prove that math can be fun. Fostering students’ joy in numbers is one way to help students excel, but helping them learn to learn can set them up for long-term success….

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  • Summer Science: 4 Safe, Easy Experiments Kids can Do at Home

    Posted June 19, 2017

    Summer allows parents a bit more time to engage with their kids and participate in experiments that they can check on every day together. Completing science experiments throughout the summer will help students to keep engaged in academic inquiry and learn more about science during their months off. The experiments outlined below can be done…

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  • 4 Presentation Mistakes that Teachers Should Avoid

    Posted June 12, 2017

    Public speaking is an important—though sometimes overlooked— part of working in education. Teachers speak in front of their classes every day. Administrators present to staff members, parents, and community groups. It’s a major component of teaching, so teachers have to be mindful of the ways presentations can go astray. It’s natural to emphasize the content of…

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  • 3 Great Projects to Get Kids Excited About Summer Reading

    Posted June 6, 2017

    Summer vacation is a much-needed break for staff and students, but encouraging students to continue to read over the break can help their minds stay mentally active. They will also be better prepared when school is back in session. Here are some activities that don’t take too much time but still promote summer reading and…

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  • A Summer that Counts: How Parents Can Keep Students’ Math Skills Fresh

    Posted June 5, 2017

    Most parents encourage their children to read during the summer and point to examples of language and word usage all around them. But that’s not how they usually approach math, says Kathy Zolla, a Colorado middle school math teacher. Zolla notes that students often like the idea of having a math-free summer, which often results…

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  • These 4 End-of-the-Year Writing Projects are Sure Bets for Engaging and Exciting Your Students

    Posted June 1, 2017

    Each school year is packed with lessons, activities and memorable moments. Encouraging students to reflect on those experiences can help them end the school year strong and give you a chance to fit in one last creative writing assignment that’s purposeful and poignant. Here are four end-of-the-year writing assignments you can try out: Create a…

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  • 4 Ways to Keep Students Engaged When Summer Break Is So Close

    Posted May 31, 2017

    When summer break is just around the bend, it’s tough to keep students engaged. But if you shake things up a bit, you can make their learning and your teaching just as memorable as it was at the beginning of the year. Here are some ideas to try out on your students: Change your room…

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  • Writing into Summer: Creative Assignments Can Keep Students Academically Engaged

    Posted May 24, 2017

    Many students see the summer break as a time to put off their studies and stop thinking about school for three months. Yet parents and teachers alike know that summer also lets students backslide in their academic development. Summer writing projects offer a chance to slow the slide — letting students dive into  subjects they…

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  • 5 Ways Teachers Can Boost Their Listening Skills

    Posted May 22, 2017

    It’s easy to say listening is important in the classroom — but actually listening well can be a different story. During any class, teachers need to keep the whole class engaged, cover a long list of topics and assess how well students are learning. Pausing to really listen to one student’s question or idea can…

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  • 6 Ways Students Can Cut Stress Before Big Tests

    Posted May 16, 2017

    Tests help us assess students’ comprehension and skills, but they can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety. To help students destress before taking a test, try one or more of the activities below. Whether you work with elementary, middle or high school students, there’s always a way to help them feel even slightly…

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  • Theater Games Use Drama Techniques to Create Fun, Engaging Classroom Experiences

    Posted May 15, 2017

    Sometimes we think theater games belong only in drama classes, but finding ways to apply these activities to your subject area can increase engagement, creativity and critical thinking. It’s also a great way to get students moving around, interacting with each other and having fun with your subject matter. Below are some theater games you…

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  • Test Anxiety: Reducing Stress on Students

    Posted May 10, 2017

    Parents and educators alike worry that standardized tests place undue burdens on students, triggering stress and anxiety. In a fast-moving culture full of pressure to accumulate good grades and broad experience portfolios, teen stress and anxiety are moving down the chain and affecting middle and elementary students as well. Sometimes this stress manifests as testing…

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  • ‘It’s Good’ Isn’t Good Enough: Getting Better Feedback in Peer Review Workshops

    Posted May 9, 2017

    When it’s done well, peer review is extremely instrumental to students, but when it isn’t done well, it’s painful for everyone and possibly detrimental to their papers. Too often, student feedback during the peer review process produces unspecific responses like “it’s good” or, even worse, incorrect grammatical corrections. To get peer review right, teachers need…

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  • 4 Great Activities that Get Students Moving and Make Learning More Fun

    Posted April 26, 2017

    Activities that get students moving can keep them engaged and provide an outlet for their pent-up energy. Getting students up out of their chairs makes learning or reviewing content fun and memorable. Just make sure you take a few crucial considerations into account when choosing movement-based activities for your students. Time and space: Think about…

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  • Visual Rhetoric: Teaching Students to Decode Media Images

    Posted April 25, 2017

    From a young age, students get inundated with images. From advertisements to political cartoons to the pictures accompanying news stories, images are everywhere. Because images convey meaning just as words do, students need to learn the principles of visual rhetoric. This knowledge helps students better understand visual arguments in the world around them, and it…

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  • The Right Way to Respond to a Student’s Wrong Answer

    Posted April 24, 2017

    Getting students to participate in classroom discussions is an essential part of teaching, from kindergarten through adult education. And while the specifics of each situation vary depending on the subject matter and the students’ age, all teachers should be prepared to respond to the student who answers a question but gets it wrong. Robert Jolles,…

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  • Try These Tips to Improve Students’ Critical Thinking Skills

    Posted April 12, 2017

    Students need strong critical thinking skills to read and write effectively in high school and college. Furthermore, many jobs require employees to think critically to analyze data, choose the best course of action and act on their choices. The earlier students cultivate critical thinking, the more skilled they will be at producing sophisticated, thoughtful analyses…

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  • Let Students Choose their Assessments and Watch their Creativity Bloom

    Posted April 11, 2017

    It’s easy to fall into a routine of assessing students the same way over and over. But letting students choose from a menu of assessments can do them a lot of good — and make you a better teacher. Sure, it takes time to create alternative assessments, but there are tons of resources online that…

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  • Why You Should Teach Students about the Multiple Intelligences Theory

    Posted April 5, 2017

    Students often equate intelligence with grades and/or test scores. But teaching students about Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences theory can show them that they are all intelligent in different ways. This perspective can boost their confidence and increase their motivation to learn. What is Gardner’s multiple intelligences theory? Gardner is a professor of education at Harvard…

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