June 2017 Monthly Round-Up For Educators

As educators, we know it’s critical to stay up-to-date with current events and trending topics for our classrooms. But with so many different resources out there (and not a lot of time), it’s hard to keep up! So, welcome to your monthly article roundup, where we’ll compile a few articles from the past month that you may find interesting, inspiring, or informative. Here’s our first batch.

This Month in Education

1.     “Harnessing Student Emotions in Service of a Cause”  (EdWeek)

Teachers of language arts, social studies, and math have been using social-emotional learning, or SEL, to teach students how to manage emotions, make responsible decisions, and build relationships. One Chicago-based elementary school teacher has been implementing this strategy as a way for his students to reflect on their emotions and deal with them in productive ways—and even engage in social justice.

2.     Google’s Be Internet Awesome Campaign

Living in a digital age can be overwhelming. And while the Internet is an amazing resource to use—especially in the classroom—teachers now need to make sure their students are prepared to make smart decisions online. Google’s Be Internet Awesome Campaign is a great resource for understanding Internet safety. There’s actually a free downloadable specifically for educators with fun and safe classroom curriculum and lesson plans.

3.     “The Dreaded Summer Slide and How to Tackle It” (Education World)

How can students enjoy their summer vacation, but also maintain their learning retention for when the new school year begins? It can be challenging, especially for lower-income families who may not have accessibility to high-quality learning opportunities. Fortunately there are plenty of simple (and free) resources out there. Here are some solutions to keep students’ brains active throughout the summer.

4.     “How to Find a Summer Teaching Job” (ThoughtCo.)

While teachers may love summer break just as much as students, sometimes adding on a summer job is what they need for some extra cash and experience. Here’s a list of ways to define your expectations for a reasonable summer job, and where to begin looking once you’re ready.

5.     “Sharing Your Best Work With Other Teachers” (Edutopia)

The Internet is one of the best ways for teachers to share their knowledge with other teachers. From creating a TED-Ed talk to uploading a lesson plan, check out these different resources that offer the ability to connect with other educators, near and far.

6.     “8 Terrific Learning Podcasts for Students” (eSchool News)

Podcasts are an excellent and innovative way to get students excited about topics connected to classroom learning assignments. And, there are so many high-quality, free content podcasts teachers can access to use as supplemental materials to their curriculum. Here’s a list of a few favorite podcasts, organized by grade-appropriateness.

How about one more link? Learn about our fully online MEd and EdD programs while you’re surfing the interwebs. (Lots of good reading there!)

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Our featured stories are an amalgamation of all things education—you’ll find articles on trends and challenges facing present-day educators, as well as resources that help educators successfully navigate through any demanding environment.

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